CIB Badge

Of all the Medals Upon our Chest From the Battles and War we knew, The one admired as THE VERY BEST
Is the one of Infantry Blue. It is only a rifle upon a wreath,
So why should it mean so much?
It is WHAT IT TOOK TO EARN IT
That gives it that Magic Touch. To earn this special accolade
You faced the enemy's fire
Whether you survived or not
God dialed that one desired.
For those of us who served the cause
It is the
COMBAT INFANTRYMAN'S BADGE...
THAT REALLY TELLS THE STORY

CIB Badge

Posts Tagged ‘Combat_Infantrymen’

75- Music for the combat infantryman — even on combat missions

Monday, September 28th, 2015

In this episode, we explore the entertainment and music that followed the combat infantryman — especially in Vietnam (due to the technology of transistor radios for portable music via battery power).

afvn web page today

Because the nature of the communication infrastructure and technology during the campaigns of the Middle East (from Desert Storm to the preset), we will be limiting this episode to an overview of WWI, WWII and Vietnam.

In Vietnam, my personal experience comes into play to reinforce the need for the average-age 19-year old combat infantryman and helicopter crewman to listen to the music popular for that generation “back in the world.”

In fact, there is an original segment of clips from AFVN (Armed Forces Vietnam Network – radio) from the 1970 time frame, which was recorded, transmitted and published from Saigon, South Vietnam. This original recording comes at the end of the narrator’s introduction.

In addition, here are a couple of links of two of the most popular songs that followed the WWII combat infantrymen into the European and Pacific theatres — however, due to technology limitations, most of the time they were limited to rear echelon locations that had vinyl record disc players to provide for the entertainment and enjoyment for all the servicemen.

 

Select this link for the selection of WWII song called DON’T SIT UNDER THE APPLE TREE.

 

Select this link for the selection of IIWW song called THIS IS THE ARMY, MR. JONES.

 

Copyright (c) 2015, Matrix Solutions Corporation. Copyright (c) 1970, AFVN radio. All rights reserved.

Songs from WWII called DON’T SIT UNDER THE APPLE TREE and THIS IS THE ARMY, MR. JONES. Interpreted by the 82nd Airborne Division Chorus, Copyright (c) 1998, 82nd Airborne Division Chorus. All rights reserved.

68- Monument to combat infantrymen dedicated in Texas

Monday, March 16th, 2015

In this audio episode, we briefly review the dedication of a monument on the grounds of the Texas State Capital — a monument for the memory of over 3,000 Texas who were killed during the Vietnam War — most of them combat infantrymen.

Texas Vietnam Veterans Monument 2014We also describe our perspectives of a movie documentary on the Vietnam war that highlighted the combat infantryman. This documentary was recommended by Don Dorsey, the president of Texas Association of Vietnam Veterans.

The title is Vietnam: Service, Sacrifice and Courage.

Vietnam-Service sacrifice and courage movieThis movie / documentary can be viewed at the link of:

https://www.youtube.com/embed/6_5gJVXK0gI

As stated by Don Dorsey’s quote in the audio episode, even though this movie is 28 minutes in length, it describes in great deal some of the accurate depictions of the war for the combat infantryman.

 Select this link to listen to this audio episode in another window.

Copyright (c) 2015, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Combat Infantrymen’s Association. All rights reserved.

39- Combat Infantrymen in Vietnam and the soldiers of today

Friday, December 25th, 2009

In this episode of The Combat Infantrymen’s Association, H21 Southern Branch Austin, Texas, Chapter, we deliver to you an audio narration of the article published in the supplement called “Welcome Home” of The VVA Veteran publicatiion (from the Vietnam Veterans of America organization) in November/December, 2009.

The title of this article is:

“…What is the diffeence between the soldiers you knew in Vietnam and the soldiers of today?”

Joe Galloway after the dedication of the Vietnam Memorial Wall replica in Mineral Wells, Texas

The article starts on page 4 of the WELCOME HOME supplement publication and is delivered complete in its entirety and unabridged.

The article is delivered from the heart by Joe Galloway. In an earlier episode of this podcast series, we had the opportunity to meet Joe in person and interview him for 8 minutes with his thoughts about the value of the Combat Infantryman’s Badge, especially as it relates to the Vietnam War Grunt.

As you will hear in this audio narration, what is exceptional in this article is that the Vietnam Veteran Combat Infantryman is the leader in providing the welcome-back, the thanks-for-your-service, and the honor to those who sacrificed from the conflicts today in the Middle East. And we feel similarly– as Joe mentioned–that as long as a Vietnam War grunt still exists, there will ALWAYS be this honor and gratitude rendered to those returning from sacrifice and service overseas from being in harm’s way.

As most Vietnam War veterans, Joe is in his late sixties (68, as of last May in 2009, if we remember from the in-person interview) as far as age goes. His experience and his sacrifice in valor speaks for itself:

Joseph L. Galloway is a military columnist for McClatchy. During the Vietnam War, Galloway served three tours in Vietnam for United Press International. Decorated for rescuing wounded American soldiers under heavy enemy fire during the battle at Landing Zone X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley, he was the only civialian awarded the Bronze Star by the U.S. Army in the Vietnam War. With Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore, Galloway co-authored a detailed account of these experiences in the bestselling book WE WERE SOLDIERS ONCE…AND YOUNG.

Copyright (c) 2009, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Vietnam Veterans of America. All Rights Reserved.

31- Liberty Bell mobile replica honors those who fell in combat- David Hall

Thursday, June 11th, 2009

In this episode of the H21 Southern Branch, Austin, Texas chapter of the Combat Infantrymen’s Association, we interview David Hall, a volunteer who drives the country’s only mobile replica of the Liberty Bell that is currently housed in Philadelphia.

Mobile Liberty Bell

David Hall was at the unveiling and dedication ceremony of the permanent replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Mineral Wells, Texas, on 30 May 2009. He preceded the ceremony of the unveiling by giving the entire crowd and audience a solemn and serious remembrance when he rang the bell 70 times.

As you will hear in this audio episode, David rang the bell 70 times–one time for each panel of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, where the 58,260 names of those killed in combat are engraved. We have also included a sample of the bell ringing¬† seven (7) times, with the special significance as explained by David himself in this podcast episode.

In addition to the bell, the mobile exhibit includes a stone monument replica on either end of the Liberty Bell of the Ten Commandments. David explains why this is significant in honoring those who fell to save our laws and country.

The website for this mobile monument is http://www.proclaimliberty.us/wordpress/ and it gives us not only the pictures of the Travelling Bell, but also:

– a History of the original Liberty Bell of the 1750’s;

– a History of this mobile Liberty Bell; and

– a chance for you to ring the bell yourself online– by just moving your mouse over the icon of the bell and clicking it.

Mobile Liberty Bell web site

We would like to thank David Hall for his patriotism and dedication to honor all those who had to make the ultimate sacrifice to defend the laws of the U.S. It is interesting and fitting to note that David’s brother is a Vietnam Veteran, and that he, himself, is of the Vietnam era.

Copyright (c) 2009, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All Rights reserved.